Signal International
  • 06-Sep-2012 to 05-Nov-2012 (CST)
  • Rigger/Operator -006
  • Pascagoula, MS, USA
  • Hourly
  • Full Time

RIGGER/OPERATOR

JOB SUMMARY:

Assembles rigging to lift and move equipment or material in shipyard: Selects cables, spreader bars, plate clamps, and shackles according to weight and size of load to be moved. Attaches shackle and cable assemblies to structural components or modules and to the crane hook. Gives directions to the Mobile Equipment Operator to ensure safety of workers and material handled, using hand signals or radio.

The above description is general in nature. A rigger may be required to perform additional duties not specifically described herein.

HOURS:

  • Typical hours for a rigger range from 40 to 55 hours per week.
  • Work that exceeds 40 hrs is considered overtime.
  • A 30-minute unpaid lunch break is provided.


TRANSPORTATION:

  • It is the responsibility of the worker to provide his or her own transportation to and from the facility.


EXPERIENCE, CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, AND TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

  • No specific education or training experience is required.
  • Prior experience with operating equipment and rigging heavy loads is beneficial.
  • A forklift license may be issued internally by Signal International, as most riggers are also employed as mobile equipment operators.


SAFETY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Riggers attend weekly safety meetings and are required to wear safety equipment including a hard hat, safety glasses, steel toe boots and ear plugs.


TOOL LIST:

Basic tools provided by the employee are:

  • Crescent Wrench
  • Screw Drivers
  • Wrenches
  • Gloves
  • Steel Toe Shoes


The facility provides the following tools:

  • All rigging equipment
  • Hard hats & Safety glasses (1st issue)
  • Respirator (where needed)


ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

  • Occasionally - Less than 1/3 of the time
  • Frequently - 1/3 to 2/3 of the time
  • Constantly - More than 2/3 of the time


I. Essential Function: Based upon knowledge of rigging principles and practices, the rigger will select and gather the shackles, cables and other rigging implements that are necessary for a given job. The rigger will then deliver the necessary items to the site of the crane and load. Shackles and other gear are kept in a central location on each of Halter's yards. The rigger will utilize a forklift with a pallet on the forks to carry and deliver the needed implements to a given location. This considerably cuts down on the amount of carrying that might be required. This practice is in place out of necessity, as it saves numerous trips from occurring.

Physical Demands: Sitting is considered occasional while operating the forklift. Standing is considered frequent and walking is considered occasional. Lifting in the 35 to 40 pound range is common, and if heavier lifting does occur, assistance should be available. The full weight of shackles and cables are experienced only very briefly while moving them onto and off of the forklift pallet.

II. Essential Function: After selecting and delivering the needed equipment to the site of the rig, the rigger will assemble the shackles, cables and other implements to evenly and safely distribute the weight of the load. Common occurrences call for 35 ton shackles that weigh approximately 45 lbs. Less commonly used are 50 ton shackles that weigh 90 pounds. Riggers are experienced in "letting the crane do the work," an expression that conveys the principle that the crane can do the vast majority of the lifting. Once cables and shackles are connected to the crane hook, it is a matter of pushing or pulling the suspended weight into position. Every so often, massively heavy vessel modules and hulls are moved and perhaps flipped over. This calls for only the thickest gauge cables and the heaviest of shackles. A 75-ton shackle, utilized for this purpose, weighs approximately 130 pounds. A single individual never handles such a big job.

Physical Demands: Typically the crane operator will lower the crane hook just above the level of the pallet. Shackles and cables can then be pulled or dragged into place, requiring less physical exertion. Walking (moving about), bending, balancing and climbing are considered frequent, while standing, crouching and kneeling are considered occasional. Pushing and pulling occurs frequently when positioning suspended cables and shackles.

III. Essential Function: After a rig is complete the rigger will again inspect his work and make any changes to the operator's specifications. Using hand signals or perhaps a radio, the rigger will guide and assist the crane operator during the move.

Physical Demands: This function is the least physically demanding, requiring the worker to stand frequently and walk occasionally.

IV. Essential Function: After a job is complete, the rigger disassembles the equipment and returns it to its proper shed or stand. The forklift is again utilized to transport the rigging equipment.

Physical Demands: Sitting is considered occasional while operating the forklift. Standing is considered frequent and walking is considered occasional. Lifting in the 35 to 40 pound range is common and if heavier lifting does occur, assistance should be available. The full weight of shackles and cables are experienced only very briefly while moving them onto and off of the forklift pallet.

V. Essential Function: Regular and predictable attendance is required.

Other reasonable duties as assigned by management.




This position has been closed and is no longer available.
Signal International

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